My first AA meeting – the value of sharing

 

I sat in on an open AA meeting one Wednesday afternoon.

I work in health promotion and wanted to experience for myself what an AA meeting is really like. I wanted to question my assumptions from popular culture and stigma.

It was one of those beautiful blue days where you cannot spot a cloud in the sky. A day where the last place you want to be is in the middle of a big city. The air was filled with humidity and my clothes were sticking to me, almost in an irritating way.

The sliding doors to the community meeting room were open. The fans were on, gently blowing the posters scattered about the walls. Posters for the 12 Steps, yoga and meditation retreats, domestic violence support services and homeless shelters. These were pinned up like offerings of hope to those who previously saw themselves as hopeless. A large notice board in the middle of the sliding doors offered privacy from the street.

There were about twenty people at the meeting. Everyone seated facing the front where the person who ran the meeting and a few sponsors sat. What struck me at first was the diversity of the group. A young woman with her toddler sat opposite me. The child spluttered throughout the meeting with a chesty cough and wriggled around on her big plastic chair.

An elderly lady sat next to me and smiled warmly when we caught a glance. There was a mix of male and female, young and old. Some had been coming to AA meetings for years, others just a few months. The people in the room where just like you and I. Some with great families and careers, others with no family left and a life that has not been so kind to them.

AA meetings are not just about remaining anonymous

They are also about being present for those in the group and the community around you.

aa meeting

The first man to share was sitting across from me. He was wearing a colourful Hawaiian shirt. But the expression on his face did not suggest that his life had been a holiday. The man opened his reflections by introducing himself. “Hi, my name is Dave* and I am an alcoholic”. The first step of the 12 Steps at an AA meeting involves admitting to yourself that you have no power over your ‘disease’. You hand over your vulnerability to a higher power and admit defeat.

The meeting was on a chapter in the book that everyone was to discuss, around the theme of not being too hard on yourself. Dave began by explaining his daily struggle with crippling anxiety. He shared with us how he hates himself for getting into this state of mind. How he panics when he cannot see a solution or an out to how he is feeling. This destructive cycle means Dave cannot hold down a stable job and ends up screwing up every job interview he has had, as he talks himself down and focuses on everything that is wrong with him and the company and the people holding the job interview.


“A community that cares”

Rachel

Austin, Texas

“I suffered from feelings of guilt and loneliness as a result of my alcoholism. Drinking was causing a serious problem when my children came home to find me unconscious. I joined this community to learn how to control my drinking and restore balance to my life.

Diego

Sydney, Australia

“I was stuck in a vicious cycle of binge drinking, blacking out, and losing my memory. One of my biggest fears was that I would fail, but it’s not a test. It’s just about getting you to think about drinking. Meeting other members and getting support has been invaluable.



Sharing is caring

When Dave started to choke up while telling his story with tears running down his cheeks. I looked around the room. The compassion on the face of each and every person in that room was obvious. It was as if invisible hands was reaching out to hold onto Dave. To squeeze his hand and tell him that that they are there for him. When others began to share their reflections on the reading listeners would often nod their head to themselves or clap in a gesture of agreement and understanding. The speaker could take as long as they wanted and there was no judgment from anywhere in this space. This unfortunately is a special treat for many people going through recovery from an alcohol or drug dependency.

Every person who shared their triumphs and their rock bottoms on that day were open and vulnerable. But I didn’t leave the meeting feeling hopeless for the members. Everyone finished their ‘sharing’ on a positive thought. Such as:

 
“But I know I’ll be okay, because I didn’t reach for the bottle this time.”
Or, “I’m slowly seeing that I need to deal with this struggle with meditation and these meetings and staying away from those who are making this hard for me.”
 

You are probably wondering what I shared at my first AA meeting

When it came time for my turn to speak I simply said that I wouldn’t be sharing today and that was more than okay. There was no pressure to tell your story. There was no discrimination from the group because you weren’t comfortable opening up. For this I felt truly honored to be able to listen to these incredible stories of strength.

It’s so easy to brush off a comment about how people who are alcohol dependant should just “stop” drinking or using drugs, and their lives will turn around. The men and women in this meeting drank as a therapy and an escape from other underlying issues. Many stories were complex and emotionally scarring that we can only begin to comprehend. They turned to alcohol because for some reason they were not able to get the help they needed early enough. That is what saddened me the most as I stepped out of the room that afternoon.

Support is imperative for recovery, and support comes from community. Unfortunately with the stigma present in our society and our current healthcare system around people who abuse these substances, we do not provide the people who need it most with a community that they deserve.


This 1 minute video shows how our community helps heavy drinkers cut back on alcohol »


What other support is available for people?

For those who feel that something like an AA meeting is too confronting to share their deepest fears and darkest experiences with complete strangers, or people who live in remote areas, or have kids and responsibilities that keep them from finding the time to attending these meetings as often as they need, a physical meeting may not be suitable.

Daybreak is an alcohol support group app created from years of experience by the Hello Sunday Morning team. It is a great alternative that provides an anonymous space, with a supportive community of people going through different stages of their own journey to recovery.

Our community says…

effects of alcohol

“I’m on day 78

I only drank once after 5 days of joining and haven’t drunk since. I absolutely know I couldn’t have done that without this forum.”

“The best thing that’s happened to me

This app and my public commitment to stop drinking stopped me from opening the fridge door. It’s Sunday morning. I’m camped by a a lake. I’m snuggled up in bed with a clear head. And there is a thank you coursing through my heart.”

“Overwhelmed at the support

Drinking has such a stigma attached to it, that it’s hard to know who to talk to. There’s a lot of judgement out there. So it is wonderful to hear other people’s stories.”

* Stories are provided with permission of members and are anonymous to protect privacy.


Our community is an alternative to AA meetings. Free download from the app stores »


Stop Your Hangovers in 2 Weeks. Guaranteed.

Surprise yourself with these benefits of the program »


effects of alcohol

Free download from the app stores »



Meet our alcohol coaches

Health Coach Briony

Briony Leo has been working in alcohol health since 2009 and has been registered as a psychologist since 2011. Her work currently involves helping people to understand and change their relationship with alcohol, and to meet their health and wellbeing goals. Her special areas of interest are counseling and using technology to support mental health and wellbeing, as well as improving overall health and functioning. She has completed further training in Neurofeedback, Schema Therapy and EMDR.


Health Coach Briony

Dr. Jess Moore has also been working in alcohol health since 2009. She has worked with clients presenting with a range of concerns and has worked in various settings including schools, universities, prisons, hospitals and non-government organisations. Part of her current work involves helping people to understand their relationship with alcohol and how to go about making changes to help them reach their goals. Jess earned her PhD in clinical psychology from The University of New South Wales. She worked on the development and evaluation of a telemental health Behavioural Parent Training intervention. She has since managed a randomised controlled trial on the feasibility and outcomes of Internet delivery of transdiagnostic Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy for adolescent anxiety and depression, at Macquarie University, and manages a number of other trials of internet-based treatments.


Daybreak is appropriate for most people who are wanting to change their relationship with alcohol. If a person is in significant distress, such as experiencing thoughts of suicide or self harm, we encourage them to seek more intensive and face to face support. Although the community is supportive, evidence shows that if people are in significant distress, supportive communities are not effective. More structured and targeted support is necessary.

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